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LOOKS - Clint Jukkala, Aubrey Levinthal, Susan Moore, & Ashley Wick

  • Gross McCleaf Gallery 127 South 16th Street Philadelphia, PA, 19102 United States (map)
Looks Card Image DRAFT 01.jpg

Infants love staring at faces and studies have shown that babies, even those less than an hour old, look at facial patterns longer than any others. From the beginning, we seek out the faces of those near us. Our need to recognize one another even leads to Pareidolia, the psychological phenomenon that describes our predisposition to see faces, even where they do not exist. LOOKS presents the paintings of four artists and their individual responses to the faces we see and seek.

 

Strong marks and bold colors dominate the surface of Clint Jukkala's paintings. His enigmatic works simultaneously reference architectural elements, features of the landscape, and facial structures. The purposeful arrangement of basic elements, including apertures and openings, tease our desire to recognize another, as well as be recognized.

 

Aubrey Levinthal's intensely personal explorations of her day-to-day life depict people immersed in the appearance and experience of the world. Many times featuring the artist herself, Levinthal's paintings preserve elements of privacy and intimacy of gaze and vision. We are invited to observe quiet moments as her subjects are deeply looking at the world around them. In one case, we, the viewer, are invisible as the subject is immune to the presence of anything outside of her focus; in the other, our gaze is met, and we become the focus.

 

Susan Moore reveals and accentuates variations of faces in her double portraits. She brings attention to the subtlety of human expression as even the same countenances convey quite different meanings. Moore's faces look out at the viewer - sometimes confrontationally and other times solidly, but always directly. Without the usual trappings of context or decoration, we experience total immersion in the subjects' gaze.

 

Ashley Wick's strange and expressive reconfigurations of faces access an inner logic which captivates and perplexes the viewer. Ears defy our geographic expectations and smiles morph into cheeks. Eyes repeat and look at us as they become a cluster of gazes. The faces in Wick's paintings invite us to find the rhyme and reason but they also remind that the faces around us can take many forms.

 

Clint Jukkala is a graduate of University of Washington in Seattle and Yale University, where he received his MFA. His work has been shown at Feature Inc., and Envoy Enterprises in New York, The deCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, MA, Tiger Strikes Asteroid in Philadelphia, PA, VOLTA NY 2013, The Currier Museum, and Soil Gallery in Seattle, and the Fred Giampietro Gallery in New Haven, CT. Jukkala is the Dean of the School of Fine Arts at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

 

Aubrey Levinthal received her BFA from Penn State University and earned her MFA at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has been featured in VOLTA NY 2018 and has exhibited at the Painting Center and Nancy Margolis Gallery in NYC.

 

Susan Moore received her MFA at the University of California, Davis and her BFA from Indiana University. Moore is on the faculty of the Tyler School of Art, Temple University. Her work is included in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Museum, the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC and the Woodmere Art Museum. Moore is represented by Gross McCleaf Gallery and has exhibited widely in Philadelphia, as well as, NYC and Rome, Italy.

 

Ashley Wick graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute and earned her MFA at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. She has exhibited in many venues in Philadelphia and most recently had a solo show at Galerie Charlot in Paris, France.

 

All of the artists in the exhibition currently live and work in Philadelphia, PA.

Earlier Event: September 7
Leigh Werrell - Out of Place
Later Event: September 7
John Moore - Counterpoint