Group Exhibition: Eastern Influences

Snyderman-Works has had the pleasure to work with many incredible artists since the gallery opened. Please join us as we celebrate a selection of work by several artists and craftspeople from that history

On view from May 19, 2017 to June 17, 2017.

First Friday opening: June 2nd, 5:30 to 8:30

Akira Yamada, #3 Vessel, Stoneware, wood-fired, 16" x 16" x 4" 2010

Akira Yamada, #3 Vessel, Stoneware, wood-fired, 16" x 16" x 4" 2010

Meditations

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The three artists in this exhibition have created their own language by allowing time and repetition to dictate the movement of each piece. Additionally, the specific materials they use are consequential to the final outcome of their work. For these artists, the act of making the pieces becomes as important as the resulting work.

On view from April 7, 2017 to May 13, 2017.

SaraNoa Mark, Samantha Mitchell, Rowland Ricketts

SaraNoa Mark’s quiet paper pieces are visions of an ancient script that is no longer translatable, yet is packed with the history of a society for which we have lost the specifics. One can find the idea of an archaic map in her work, or the ruins of once important structures. These pieces could have been created with soil taken from a holy site or a scrap of a desert traveler’s tent.

Samantha Mitchell’s recent work has been greatly influenced by various visits to and residencies in the Great Basin and Sonoran deserts. In her work, one can find translations of these vast landscapes, often described by distant horizon lines defined by glowing swaths of color and insistent, repetitive marks. The ocean of tiny lines that Mitchell uses to fill the space seems far from automated. In fact it is the variations of each mark that create such a dynamic expanse.

Rowland Ricketts has used the indigo plant as a basis for his practice for many years. The growth and harvest of this plant create a crucial timeline in his life, and consequently, his work. The woven pieces in this exhibit have been left partially exposed to the sun throughout an entire year of growing, harvesting and composting the indigo plants. This project explores the idea of impermanence, and elegantly records the passage of time through color.